Archive for category OSU

Nick Wolack: Evolved Body Art

Nick Wolack, the owner of Evolved Body Art, poses in the old shop location above Too’s on North High Street. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo Editor

I am often fortunate enough to have the time available for a visit from Nick and staff members from his businesses. Unfortunately, this semester did not provide us a chance to schedule something. I wanted to toot his horn, though, as he was featured in The Lantern.

Evolved Body Art continues to be the only tattoo business that I “vouch for” because of their adherence to quality standards and their partnerships in a variety of ethical events and organizations. I am proud to call Nick a friend and consider him a colleague in the world of education.

Lantern Q&A with Nick Wolack

Care to learn more about some of the businesses and events at which Nick hangs his creative hat? See links below!

 

 

http://www.evolvedbodyart.com

http://www.traumacolumbus.com

http://www.rendezvoushair.com

http://www.draumacolumbus.com

 

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Book Drive Challenge!

au-16-book-drive

Competition is fun, eh?

We (Buckeyes) have a long-standing feud with the folks up north… y’know.. Mmmm(cough)ichigan! Ah, but it isn’t all football – we also use that competitive urge when we have blood drive challenges with the Red Cross to see which university can bleed the most – and save lives while they do it.

Competition CAN be fun and it CAN be productive.

So… drumroll please… This semester, my activity of choice is a book drive. In our text (The Second Shift by Hochschild and Machung) we learn that not all families are created equal. In class, we view a video (Nigel Marsh’s tedtalk about balancing family and work),  in which the speaker relates how he read to his son from Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach.  We discuss how some families have no books on hand.

This semester (AU16), students in my two 2367 classes will have an opportunity to help children in their community WHILE scratching that itch to compete.

I’ve worked with a staff member from a local middle school to gather a list of these students’ favorite books, authors, and topics. My students will collect books and other supplies that these students (in “inclusive” programs) can use in their classroom. Those students will be encouraged to fall in love with some of those books and be permitted to take them home – to keep – as their own.

I’ll pop in from time-to-time to post updates as we will not be taking one load of donations (as we did with our clothing drive in Sp16), but delivering books and items as we collect them… in order to get them into the hands of those who need them as quickly as possible!

Let the games begin…

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Community Involvement – Clothing Drive 2016

When possible, I encourage my students to step out of their LITERAL comfort zone – to venture into the community around OSU – to see life through someone else’s lens.

I do this through many of my extra credit opportunities. I also do this – from time to time – with agencies. A few years ago, my 2367 students collected food for the Mid Ohio Foodbank and my “Helping Skills” class was visited by a representative of that foodbank to explain what they do and how we can help. Often, my 5440 students meet activists in the human sexuality realm and learn – firsthand – the challenges they face.

In Spring of 2016, I had two classes of 2367 students and they combined efforts to gather clothing (especially coats and OSU gear) for some students attending Beechcroft High School.

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That effort far surpassed expectations and we created a board in Campbell Hall to commemorate the experience.

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The whole effort came about organically. I spoke about students – in our own community – who walk to school without coats in the dead of winter. I talked about young people who have no college plans because that seed has not been planted.

My students were ready to help. Wow. What an amazing response it was. Over the course of two weeks, students brought in coats and hoodies along with t-shirts and fun items as well. They were encouraged to donate OSU items to foster college aspirations. The clothing drive was not attached to points or homework. They didn’t get extra credit for donating, but we collected more than 100 items in quick order.

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With the assistance of Skye Zuza (at Beechcroft High School), several high school students in the special education program made posters about the drive to share with my students. Ms. Zuza was also instrumental in receiving and distributing the new and gently-used OSU gear to Beechcroft students.

  • A special thanks to the students in both of my 2367 classes in the Sp16 Semester – for their generosity and interest in others.
  • A special shout-out goes to Deston Howard (of my Monday/Wednesday class) who created the informative maps seen in the bulletin board image above. He took on that mapping project as an individual extra credit project and knocked it out of the park by providing all of us with a visual comparison of the demographics of the communities being served by a few of the wealthiest and poorest schools in our area.
  • I am grateful to the staff at Beechcroft – They were essential in getting items to the students who had need and took the opportunity to talk to students about college aspirations.

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Photo taken by – and used with permission of – Raquel Bahmer (student)

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We all can’t stay here forever

no one is perfect pencils have erasersI’m on campus for a meeting today.

Meetings aren’t generally my favorite thing but this one? Relatively painless 🙂

It’s a nice change from grading -to be simply talking with a colleague  – and so here I am. Most of the work from Spring 2016 is behind us, and a new Carmen is on its way. Summer (and summer classes) are on the horizon. Change is hard but it is good.

Did you catch that?

Change. Is. Good.

Speaking of change… OSU is very very quiet today. This is what happens when students are either GONE for good, or have headed off for summer plans… or are curled up in a ball nursing their wounds after grade-posting. Here’s hoping it’s one of the first two for all of my students. What a great semester – and what fantastic students. Yes… fantastic for the most part. I said it.

We hear a lot about  millennials and it’s often negative. I’ve got news for the world: My students aren’t better OR worse than the generation that came before them. Some of them have their head on straight and are focused on their work. Some of them could not care less about school work. Some are just trying to figure out who they are in the world. That’s okay. It’s what young adults are doing today. It’s the same thing their parents and grandparents did before them.

I want to thank my students for an awesome semester. Some of you gave me a headache but nearly all of you made me smile or laugh at least once. If you screwed up this semester? Time for a change. Don’t let that define you. If you screw up in the future? Same advice. We are all capable of monumental failures and epic achievements. I’ve made my fair share of both. I suspect I’ll do the same in the future 😉

I always ask students to keep in touch if they’ve graduated. Let me know where you land… where life takes you. If you start a business or a family (or both), I’d love to hear about it. If you are at OSU still (or for a visit), let’s meet up for coffee.

anita

 

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I hope you get the chance…

imagesSo that happened. Yesterday. There was more violence and much closer than many of us would care to feel it. Scary? Yes. Receiving those “shelter in place” messages can send some of us to a dark place.

Fear.

Fear isn’t terribly useful past its initial “flight or fight” impulse. It’s healthy to fear if it spurs us to action and saves us further damage. Wallowing in it? Avoiding it? Neither are useful. Ah, but the fear  can also put us into a fairly primitive place where our minds realize how much of our day-to-day life is just noise.  In those moments we receive a gift of sorts: We realize what is and is not truly important to us. That’s useful too.

Fear.

Do your best to face it.

Feel it.

Appreciate the initial message your body and mind communicate to you… they are trying to keep you safe.

My best advice is to FEEL it but not FEED it.

Easier said than done, I know. Take care of yourself – ask for help if you need it – and refocus your energies on the things you CAN control: Studying, for instance (wink).

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Because many of us have been socialized to say “I’m sorry” far too much

thank you versus i am sorry

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Office Hours Today

imagesI have contacted appointments, but wanted to post here (and twitter) as well, just in case you planned on dropping by: I have a cold. I’m doing my best to get over it NOW before class starts so you don’t have to watch me snifflingsneezingcoughing.

My 10-2 OSU office hours today are being cancelled. I am checking email from home, however. If you need to see me, please email and set up a time to do so. Best times are actually the first day of classes (Monday, the 11th) in the morning, FYI. I’m surprisingly free that morning.

I hope everyone is taking care of themselves (fluid, rest, vitamin C, etc)

Anita

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IDENTITY PROJECT all month at OSU

the identity projectFor all students (past and present) as well as folks who “happen by” the blog…
I’d like to take a moment to tell you about the IDENTITY PROJECT on display at OSU this month.  Better, yet, I’ll let Angie Wellman tell you about that AND MORE (below).

Students in my HDFS 5440 course this semester may use this as an extra credit opportunity but must visit the exhibit and plan on doing so in a thoughtful and UNrushed manner.


Welcome to cooler air, beautiful leaves, and time to gather with family and friends! As we begin October, and our celebration of LGBTQ History Month, the Ohio State campus community is coming together for a myriad of programs and events framed around the theme of “Telling Our Stories.”
 
For lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people (and those whose sexual or gender identity falls somewhere else along the spectrum), openness and authenticity has been an especially powerful tool in telling our stories — both to others in the LGBTQ community and to allied audiences.
 
The programs and events planned for LGBTQ History Month, as well as the upcoming Transgender Celebration Week in November, are framed to move us, to make us think, to make us remember, to make us reconsider our assumptions, to change our minds, to introduce us to people and places and communities we want to learn more about.
 
Probably the most visual component of this is the “Identity Project” display in the Great Hall of the Ohio Union.  It is a photography exhibit wherein those who were photographed were empowered to choose the words that they wanted to represent them. The photographer, Sarah Deragon, describes it in this way:
“The Identity Project resonates with people because the photo project pushes up against the preconceived notions of what it is to be LGBTQ in today’s society. Not only are the portraits striking, the participants in the project are playing with language, making up entirely new terms (transgenderqueer or inbetweener) and showing pride in their complex and ever changing identities.”
For more insight to the thoughts of those photographed, check out this link to their testimonials.
 
Already, the art installation has sparked discussion.
“What does this have to do with LGBT History Month?” Why didn’t we display pictures of cute couples and LGBT parents?” “Aren’t some of these labels sexualized? Doesn’t this reinforce the slurs that people use against us?”
 
My answer is as simple as it is complicated. So often we talk about how to get beyond the limiting, even destructive, identities we create for ourselves, or have been imposed on us in our lives. Historically, folks in the LGBTQ community have been labeled, and those labels have resulted in familial, political, economic, and social oppression.
 
Why this photo exhibit? What power in self-identifying! What freedom in sharing our identities with the words that we, alone, choose! What does it mean for us as a community to make visible, to give voice, to those segments of our community who are so often erased from our collective narrative when their stories, identities or lives are not “mainstream” or “assimilated” to society’s accepted norms?  What does it mean to bring visibility to our community’s most invisible, marginalized members?
To reflect on the words that folks have chosen and feel empowered by…and then reflect on what those words illicit in us.

This year, many in the LGBTQ and allied community celebrated marriage equality. In fact, we are fortunate to be hosting the lead plaintiff in the Supreme Court case, Jim Obergefell, as our National Coming Out Day Keynote. This has, indeed, been an exceptionally historic year.
 
And as we celebrate, we cannot stop working. I said it in June, and am saying it again now. This struggle is about more than marriage equality. This work that we do together to create change is about all of us.  Our community includes a vibrant, wide spectrum of people, who have very different lived experiences and ways of moving through the world. AND-each and every person is valuable, and deserves to be able to live open, fulfilling, authentic lives.
 
The National Celebration of LGBT History Month provides an opportunity for us to raise awareness, to build community, and to celebrate the contributions of extraordinary LGBTQ people.
 
At OSU, the photo exhibit, the programs, and the discussions that are offered as a part of this celebration of community create space for each of us to reflect on our movement: Our past, our present, and our future.  Through all of these shared mediums, we create space to ensure that each part of our campus community is valued, respected and included.
 
Important questions and dialogues this history month:
What are you doing to create space? What are you doing to bring visibility to marginalized identities? What are you doing to create change?
 
Equally as important: what are you doing to live authentically, happily, and whole in all of your many identities?
 
Stop by the MCC, I would welcome the opportunity to chat with you about all of these things!
 
In Community & Solidarity,

Angie Wellman
Student Life Multicultural Center

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